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Behind the Scenes Look at Barry Lyndon

Behind the Scenes Look at Barry Lyndon

When you think of Stanley Kubrick, most of us immediately think of 2001: A Space Odyssey or A Clockwork Orange. One of Kubrick's most accomplished films is actually Barry Lyndon. If you haven't watched it, watch it now! Just be prepared for three hours and twenty three minutes of slow, meticulously crafted scenes, costumes, and nuances.

PHOTO CREDIT: Cinephilla & Beyond
I’m not sure if I can say that I have a favourite Kubrick picture, but somehow I keep coming back to Barry Lyndon. I think that’s because it’s such a profoundly emotional experience. The emotion is conveyed through the movement of the camera, the slowness of the pace, the way the characters move in relation to their surroundings. People didn’t get it when it came out. Many still don’t. Basically, in one exquisitely beautiful image after another, you’re watching the progress of a man as he moves from the purest innocence to the coldest sophistication, ending in absolute bitterness—and it’s all a matter of simple, elemental survival. It’s a terrifying film because all the candlelit beauty is nothing but a veil over the worst cruelty. But it’s real cruelty, the kind you see every day in polite society.
— Martin Scorsese
kubrick-editing-barry-lyndon-film
PHOTO CREDIT: Vivian Kubrick

Facts we found about the movie:

  • It was based off of the 1844 novel The Luck of Barry Lyndon by William Makepeace Thackeray, Kubrick's desire to adapt Vanity Fair and his obsession with Napoleon; 
  • The camera lens used was developed by NASA, and was essential for the unique look of the film, especially in the candle lit scenes.
  • He sought out 18th century clothing for costume design and inspiration;
  • His daughter, Vivian, appears in the magic show scene;
  • The shoot for this film was an astounding 350+ days, this was in part due to Kubrick's perfectionism, but also because CANDLES that had to be replaced every time they burnt down;

Lastly, after the success of 2001: A Space Odyssey and A Clockwork Orange, Barry Lyndon was considered a commercial disappointment. That didn't stop the acclaim for the film. It tied with Spartacus for the Kubrick film with the most Oscars, at four (Best Art Direction, Set Direction, Best Costume Design, Best Cinematography and Best Musical Score).

We found a great in-depth article written by Cinephilla & Beyond about Barry Lyndon, click the button below to read more:

Next Week's Episode : Prisoners

Next Week's Episode : Prisoners

Next Week's Episode : Barry Lyndon

Next Week's Episode : Barry Lyndon