Episode 173 - Life of Brian

This week, we watch the classic Monty Python comedy that has been banned in multiple countries and denounced by religious groups all over the world.  The film itself doesn't do very much to insult religion, but it does a lot to get you rolling on the floor, as the comedy group showcases their trademark silliness in some of the funniest scenes ever put to film.  Life of Brian (1979), directed by Terry Jones.

Episode 174 - Rush

This week, we watch the incredible true story of Niki Lauda and James Hunt, two formula one racers who's rivalry in the 1976 World Championship gained the attention of the world.  While the film may have taken some liberties with the relationship between Niki and James, the movie aims to remain true to the real happenings of the season, and largely succeeds.  Rush (2013), directed by Ron Howard. 

Episode 177 - Hotel Rwanda

This week, we watch the film that portrays the historical events of the Rwandan Genocide through the story of a hotel manager who protected over 1,000 refugees in the midst of the massacre.  Don Cheadle portrays Paul Rusesabagina, a man who risked his family members lives, as well as his own, to save innocent lives in a performance that will most likely continue to define his career.  Hotel Rwanda (2004), directed by Terry George.

Episode 181 - Spotlight

This week, we watch the best picture winning film that aims and succeeds to tell the true story of the hard working Boston Globe reporter/editor/writer team that broke the story on pedophile priests in Boston, and the systematic coverup that the Catholic Church provides for those who get caught.  A very special guest co-hosts this episode - Kevin Slane, who is an entertainment writer (among other things) at the Boston Globe. Spotlight, directed by Tom McCarthy.

Episode 182 - Network

This week, we watch the amazingly prophetic film that, while being created over 40 years ago, depicts the current day network news situation almost exactly.  This movie predicted reality television shows over a decade before they aired, and also satirized news stations selling credibility for ratings before that reality has come to pass.  Network, directed by Sidney Lumet.

Episode 183 - Zootopia

This week, we watch the animated comedy that tells the tale of a small town bunny moving to Zootopia, a city where all animals can live together without stepping on each other.   Also following in Disney tradition, this film introduces a great pop song that you will grow to hate as it plays over and over again in your head.  Zootopia, directed by Bryon Howard and Rich Moore.

Episode 184 - Mad Max: Fury Road

This week, we watch the unprecedented sequel that pumped blood back into the Max Mad trilogy with a shotgun, the sci-fi/fantasy film that brought an imaginative, cohesive plot to the screen with almost no dialogue, the action movie that received a best picture nomination.  With special guest/Mad Max trilogy binger, Tim Brown.  WITNESS ME!  Mad Max: Fury Road (2015), directed by George Miller.

Episode 185 - Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

This week, we watch the block-busting film that paved the way for all buddy movies that came after it.  Paul Newman and Robert Redford are a perfect team, as they rob and steal their way across the mid-west. Once a super-posse is assembled to take them down, they attempt an escape to South America.  Comedy ensues.  Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), directed by George Roy Hill.

Episode 186 - Shutter Island

This week, we watch the mind-bending thriller that begs to be viewed more than once.  Leonardo Dicaprio is a detective that is about to blow the lid off of a government conspiracy located within a mental institution on a remote island off the coast of Boston...or so we are lead to believe.! Shutter Island (2010), directed by Martin Scorsese.

Episode 187 - The 400 Blows

This week, we watch the wonderful story of a young French boy and his downward spiral.  This timeless and magical film was one of the first of the French New Wave, and the one that brought international attention to the movement.  This film hasn't aged a day.  The relatable story is as relevant as ever, the acting from a cast of mostly children is incredible, and it looks and sounds amazing. The historical importance of this film can not be overstated.  The 400 Blows (1959), directed by Francois Truffaut.

Episode 188 - Stand By Me

This week, we watch the rare Stephen King adaptation that omits anything supernatural and simply focuses on the characters.  Rare also in that it's a film adaptation of one of his books and it isn't terrible.  Four kids take a two day trip down the railroad track in search of the body of a dead classmate, and stellar child acting ensues.Stand By Me (1986), directed by Rob Reiner.

Episode 189 - In the Name of the Father

This week, we watch the story of the Guildford Four and the Maguire Seven, a group of young men and woman who were wrongly accused and imprisoned for the terrorist bombing of a pub.  The true story turns into a backdrop for the relationship between one of the four (Daniel Day Lewis) and his father (Pete Postlethwaite), and their time spent together in prison.  In the Name of the Father, directed by Jim Sheridan.