All in Classic

Episode 112 - Some Like It Hot

This week, we watch what many consider to be the best comedy of all time. Two men witness a mob hit, and to survive being rubbed out themselves, they have to dress up like woman, join an all female band, and accompany them on their trip to Florida. Silliness ensues. Some Like It Hot (1959), directed by Billy Wilder.

Episode 114 - Unforgiven

This week, we watch Clint Eastwood’s last Western, and the one that landed him the Oscar for Best Picture. Clint does his usual (and great) scowl and gravel-y whispering, but instead of the violence playing out like in an action movie, it is given a weight that almost flips all his previous genre movies on end. Gene Hackman steals the show, eating up the scenery as Little Bill. Unforgiven (1992), directed by Clint Eastwood.

Episode 115 - The Third Man

This week, we watch the classic Noir that takes place in a post World War II Vienna. A man was hit by a car and killed under mysterious circumstances, and his friend won’t stop doing his own detective work until he finds out what really happened. Filmed on location in 1948, the bombed out buildings against cobble stone and cavernous sewer tunnels make for an outstanding setting for this classic story. The Third Man (1949), directed by Carol Reed.

Episode 117 - Raging Bull

This week, we watch true story of Jake La Motta, one of the toughest boxers to ever step into the ring. With only 9 minutes of boxing in the 2-hour-plus runtime, this film focuses on the rage and jealousy that Jake experienced with his second wife as well as his brother. Robert De Niro’s most raw and physically demanding performance. Raging Bull (1980), directed by Martin Scorsese.

Episode 122 - Chinatown

This week, we watch the film that launched Jack Nicholson into stardom while creating perhaps the best film noir of all time, decades after the genre left the mainstream. With a chaotic shoot, and uncertainty about the quality of the film until its 11 Academy Award nominations, it remains fascinating to watch the mystery of the films story unravel with Mr. Gittes. Chinatown (1974), directed by Roman Polanski.

Episode 126 - On The Waterfront

This week, we watch the American classic that portrays the life of a dockworker who works for the mob. This film changed Hollywood movies forever with Marlon Brando’s performance, which brought a type of realism into the mainstream that was previously only seen in a small number of European films. This story was also based on true to life violent criminal activity going on at the time. On The Waterfront (1954), Elia Kazan.

Episode 128 - Ikiru

This week, we watch the tale of a man diagnosed with stomach cancer, which causes him to reflect on his seemingly wasted life. Taking its time to establish moods appropriate for the subject matter, this film makes you think about what it means to be alive, and how to get the most out of life with what short time we have. Ikiru (1952), directed by Akira Kurosawa.

Episode 130 - The Gold Rush

This week, we watch the second oldest movie on the list! The Little Tramp character (Charlie Chaplin in big shoes and tattered cloths) is on his way to California to make it big digging up gold, but gets stuck halfway on a snowy mountain top, where he has to avoid the elements, being eaten by his fellow humans, loneliness, and gravity. Playing like a series of comedy sketches, this film holds up amazingly well after nearly 100 years. The Gold Rush (1925), directed by Charlie Chaplin.

Episode 131 - Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

This week, we watch Jimmy Stewart become a star, in one of the most perfectly aged films of all time. Everything is somehow still relevant 80 years later, from the humor to the characters, to the dead-on commentary on political corruption. This film, on a short list alongside 12 Angry Men, should be required viewing for everyone in the United States. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), directed by Frank Capra.

Episode 132 - The Bridge on the River Kwai

This week, we watch the classic war film that dominated the Oscars the year it was released. On a remote Japanese island, a large group of British and American soldiers, now prisoners, are forced to build a bridge. The movie’s production took place in the jungle, and included hundreds of extras and enormous sets, yet the story of the soldiers is what makes this film a classic that still holds up today. The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), directed by David Lean.

BONUS EPISODE! All the President's Men

This week, we go off the top 250 list and watch the film that set the standard on how to make an interesting, funny, and informative story about the tedium that is good reporting, and would rightfully accept any and all association to the best picture winner Spotlight, as the influences are apparent. How is this not one of the top 250? All the President’s Men (1976), directed by Alan Pakula.

Episode 135 - The Seventh Seal

This week, we watch the film that put the legendary director Ingmar Bergman on the map, which lead some of cinemas best works, and also some of its most pretentious. Known for its now famous image of a knight playing chess on a beach with death, this movie is worth watching more for the ideas it presents, and not necessarily for the craft or for entertainment. The Seventh Seal (1957), directed by Ingmar Bergman.

Episode 140 - Wild Strawberries

This week, we watch the classic Bergman movie that is Stanley Kubrick's second favorite film of all time. An isolated, accomplished older man reflects on his life choices as he nears death. The story unravels slowly and tells a simple tale, but one that we can all relate to. Wild Strawberries (1957), directed by Ingmar Bergman.