All tagged classic

Episode 117 - Raging Bull

This week, we watch true story of Jake La Motta, one of the toughest boxers to ever step into the ring. With only 9 minutes of boxing in the 2-hour-plus runtime, this film focuses on the rage and jealousy that Jake experienced with his second wife as well as his brother. Robert De Niro’s most raw and physically demanding performance. Raging Bull (1980), directed by Martin Scorsese.

Episode 122 - Chinatown

This week, we watch the film that launched Jack Nicholson into stardom while creating perhaps the best film noir of all time, decades after the genre left the mainstream. With a chaotic shoot, and uncertainty about the quality of the film until its 11 Academy Award nominations, it remains fascinating to watch the mystery of the films story unravel with Mr. Gittes. Chinatown (1974), directed by Roman Polanski.

Episode 126 - On The Waterfront

This week, we watch the American classic that portrays the life of a dockworker who works for the mob. This film changed Hollywood movies forever with Marlon Brando’s performance, which brought a type of realism into the mainstream that was previously only seen in a small number of European films. This story was also based on true to life violent criminal activity going on at the time. On The Waterfront (1954), Elia Kazan.

Episode 130 - The Gold Rush

This week, we watch the second oldest movie on the list! The Little Tramp character (Charlie Chaplin in big shoes and tattered cloths) is on his way to California to make it big digging up gold, but gets stuck halfway on a snowy mountain top, where he has to avoid the elements, being eaten by his fellow humans, loneliness, and gravity. Playing like a series of comedy sketches, this film holds up amazingly well after nearly 100 years. The Gold Rush (1925), directed by Charlie Chaplin.

Episode 131 - Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

This week, we watch Jimmy Stewart become a star, in one of the most perfectly aged films of all time. Everything is somehow still relevant 80 years later, from the humor to the characters, to the dead-on commentary on political corruption. This film, on a short list alongside 12 Angry Men, should be required viewing for everyone in the United States. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), directed by Frank Capra.

Episode 135 - The Seventh Seal

This week, we watch the film that put the legendary director Ingmar Bergman on the map, which lead some of cinemas best works, and also some of its most pretentious. Known for its now famous image of a knight playing chess on a beach with death, this movie is worth watching more for the ideas it presents, and not necessarily for the craft or for entertainment. The Seventh Seal (1957), directed by Ingmar Bergman.

Episode 140 - Wild Strawberries

This week, we watch the classic Bergman movie that is Stanley Kubrick's second favorite film of all time. An isolated, accomplished older man reflects on his life choices as he nears death. The story unravels slowly and tells a simple tale, but one that we can all relate to. Wild Strawberries (1957), directed by Ingmar Bergman.

Episode 149 - Tokyo Story

This week, we watch the film that was rated as the #1 best movie of all time by 358 of the biggest directors in the world (including Scorsese, Tarantino, Coppola, and many others). This film takes on the seemingly not so interesting topic of every day life, and uses its deliberate pacing (slow) to add weight to its topics in a way that we rarely see on the screen. Tokyo Story (1953), directed by Yasujiro Ozu.

Episode 153 - The Deer Hunter

This week, we watch the best picture winning film that made a huge positive shift in the public opinion towards Vietnam Veterans in the US. This film takes something that didn't occur once in the written history of the Vietnam war (Russian roulette), center's itself around it, and makes a grand, metaphorical statement about the random violence of war. The Deer Hunter (1978), directed by Michael Cimino.

Episode 158 - Dial M For Murder

This week, we watch the classic Alfred Hitchcock adaptation of the stage play about organizing and attempting the murder of a cheating wife. Great acting and fun plot twists keep this film entertaining throughout, which is a feat, given that the film takes place almost entirely in just one room. And we hope you like dialogue. Dial M For Murder, directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

Episode 159 - Gone With The Wind

This week, we watch the longest film of all!  The highest grossing movie of all time (adjusted for inflation) is ripe with questionable content, with the racism being the worst offender.  This might always be considered a classic, but should it be? Gone With The Wind (1939), directed by Victor Fleming.

Episode 172 - It Happened One Night

This week, we watch the classic romantic comedy that walked away with the top 5 Oscars for 1934, one of only three films in history to do the same. The oldest movie we've watched so far on our mission, this film has aged beautifully, as the comedy remains laugh out loud funny for the entire runtime, and the acting between the two leads is very believable and fun to watch. It Happened One Night (1934), directed by Frank Capra.

Episode 173 - Life of Brian

This week, we watch the classic Monty Python comedy that has been banned in multiple countries and denounced by religious groups all over the world.  The film itself doesn't do very much to insult religion, but it does a lot to get you rolling on the floor, as the comedy group showcases their trademark silliness in some of the funniest scenes ever put to film.  Life of Brian (1979), directed by Terry Jones.